To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age novel by Harper Lee about two young children named Scout and Jem Finch in their journey of understanding prejudice and discrimination. Raised by their father, a fair lawyer known as Atticus Finch, the two believed that the world was a great and wonderful place due to their innocence of being young children. As their first judgments on an outcast named Boo Radley convinced them that he was a dangerous man, a trial of a colored man opened. The suspect, Tom Robinson, had been proved innocent by Atticus, who believed that everyone was equal despite their skin color. However, discrimination prevailed in the city, and he was judged guilty. When Scout and Jem found out about this unjust action, they learned that the world wasn’t the perfect place they imagined, and that there is pain and suffering along the way. A few days after the trial, the two kids were assaulted by a man, but surprisingly, Boo Radley appeared and saved them from the stalker. Scout and Jem faced multiple epiphanies about how racial injustice and judging someone by false accusations is not something that should be regulated.

This story is a delicate and meaningful series of events that teaches readers the devastation that occurs within rumors and discrimination. Harper Lee has written the novel out incredibly well, and it forces us to think about the cruel world and how we can prevent the social norm from getting the best of us. I would suggest readers among the ages of 13 to read this 5-star masterpiece.

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